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The RECEDE project aims 

1. To theorise the role of (quasi-)statutory and voluntary sector actors in the regulation of detention as a system of interdependent institutions, across glocal geographical scales

2. To conceptualise relationships between detention regulation, law and policy ‘on the books’ and ‘bottom up’ norm making in the cells

3. To theorise how and by whom innovations in detention regulation, policy and practice are and could be brokered

4. To produce a new comprehensive, empirically generated model of detention regulation (RECEDE), illustrating how criminal justice could be regulated to improve public health and societal safety; and disseminate the model with multiscalar, multisectoral stakeholders.  

Prison wall with path running along side
Prison fence with razor wire
Professor Philippa Tomczak

Professor Philippa Tomczak

Principal Investigator

Professor Philippa Tomczak holds a £1.1m UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship and £1.3m European Research Council Starting Grant examining the regulation/ oversight of criminal justice detention, with a focus on detainee death investigations. Philippa’s grandparents were Polish prisoners of war and she has been bereaved by suicide, which underpins her particular interest. She directs the Prisons, Health and Societies Research Group and undertook research and impact work with the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman from 2019-2022. Philippa’s publications can be viewed here

In 2022 Philippa was awarded the European Society of Criminology Young Criminologist of the year award , an annual award conferred to Europe’s leading young criminologist. Between 2015 and 2018 Philippa was a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow and British Academy Rising Star at the University of Sheffield Centre for Criminological Research. She has a PhD in Criminology from the University of Manchester School of Law, and a BA, MA and MSc from the University of Oxford. She originally trained as a Geographer.

Dr Tom Kemp

Dr Tom Kemp

Senior Research Fellow

Dr Tom Kemp is Senior Research Fellow in the School of Sociology and Social Policy on Dr Philippa Tomczak’s European Research Council funded “Regulating Criminal justice detention: glocal prospects for public health and societal safety” project and previously worked as a Research Fellow on the UKRI funded ‘Prison Regulation for Safer Societies: Participatory, Effective, Efficient?’ study in which he developed a critique of international prison regulation. 

Tom previously researched the law and politics of immigration detention and published a book Activism and the Detention of Migrants in 2023. From 2019 to 2021, Tom worked as a Lecturer at Nottingham Law School, teaching Public Law, Criminology and Criminal Justice, and Human Rights Law. Tom’s publication can be viewed here.

Dr Matthew Hall

Dr Matthew Hall

Research Fellow

Dr Matthew Hall’s expertise is in the critical examination of surveillance and other security focused practices and technologies, using theories at the intersection of political philosophy and sociology. Matthew completed a PhD in 2017 investigating the ways in which surveillance is used to enforce many liberal ‘settlements’, such as citizenship, welfare and rights. Following this Matthew taught political theory seminars between 2017 and 2018 at Royal Holloway, before becoming an ESRC post-doctoral fellow in the department of Philosophy, Politics and International Relations also at Royal Holloway. From 2019 to 2023 Matthew was a researcher for Trilateral Research, a research institute specialising in ethics assessments and regulatory analysis of emerging technologies. Matthew is currently a research fellow on ‘REgulating Criminal justicE Detention’ (RECEDE) in which he is researching the role played by voluntary and community groups in regulating detention spaces across courts, custody and prisons. 

Dr Roxanna Dehaghani

Dr Roxanna Dehaghani

Co-Investigator

Dr Roxanna Dehaghani is a socio-legal researcher based at Cardiff University who focuses on understanding and improving the vulnerable position of the accused, particularly pre-trial. Roxanna works at the intersections of criminal justice, human rights, and legal psychology, and am particularly interested in how criminal justice policy and practice can both advance the position of the accused and exacerbate the vulnerable position of the accused. A large body of her work has focused on the vulnerable suspect in police custody, and the safeguards, rights and entitlements engaged at the first (and often only) stage of the criminal process. 

Ruth Elmer

Ruth Elmer

Research Project Manager

Ruth Elmer is Research Project Manager in the School of Sociology and Social Policy and currently manages Professor Philippa Tomczak’s grant funding. Ruth has over 14 years project management experience, gained initially working for the third sector with a wide range of funders and stakeholders delivering projects centred on education, health and livelihoods. She joined the University of Nottingham in 2016, supporting a range of research projects in the School of Education. Ruth joined the School of Sociology and Social Policy in December 2021.